World Hepatitis Day 2017

World Hepatitis Day is marked globally on 28 July.

A NOHEP FUTURE

NOHep logo
The 
World Hepatitis Alliance has committed to eliminating viral hepatitis by 2030.

Imagine a future without hepatitis C. Can we achieve this in the Australian bleeding disorders community?

CURING HEP C


New revolutionary hepatitis C treatments are now available in Australia.

  • High cure rates - 95% overall
  • Few if any side effects.

We are pleased to hear from Haemophilia Treatment Centres that most people with bleeding disorders have now been treated and cured of their hep C.

What is it like to have the new treatment and be cured?

In our new video Paul and Len tell their personal stories.

“I was handed the printout of results. The three words I knew would be there, were there:
VIRUS NOT DETECTED
 I was cured!!!!”
Len

“Having had the new treatment and being cured has had a big impact on my quality of life. I have noticed over the last few months that I have a lot more energy. I used to go to work and then go home and feel really tired, now I get home and tinker about in the shed or whatever for a couple of hours if I feel like it.”
Paul

“I feel a lot better knowing I don’t have hepatitis C anymore. I’m going to be around a bit longer!”
David

WHAT CAN YOU DO TO HELP?
  • Spread the word!
  • Many people with bleeding disorders were exposed to hep C. Have you ever been tested? If you used factor before 1993 – even as a baby – you could be at risk. Act now – if you don’t know whether you have hep C or not, get tested!

“If you don’t know if you have hep C, get tested. It was just a fluke thing that I found out. But if I had known earlier that I had hep C, I probably wouldn’t have cirrhosis of the liver because I could have had it treated back years ago.”
David

  • If you have hep C, talk to your doctor about treatment that could cure your hep C
WHAT’S STOPPING YOU FROM TREATMENT?

 

Don't wait for warning signs
Don’t wait until you have symptoms of liver disease to start treatment.

 

Liver disease with hepatitis C can advance silently and you may not be aware that you are developing advanced liver disease such as cirrhosis or liver cancer.

 

 

 

 

  • Treatment is easy

hep c treatment

 

“How difficult to take? Pop them [tablets] in your mouth at the same time each day and wash down with a glass of water.”
Len

“The new treatment was nothing like the interferon treatments. I had one tablet a day every morning for 24 weeks.”
Paul

 

  • Worried about side-effects?

“For the first two weeks I had some side-effects while my body got used to it: fatigue, a little bit of nausea. But after that there was nothing much; life just returned to normal. It didn’t affect my work.”
Paul

“The side effects? Nil.”
Len

  • Hard to get to the hepatitis clinic?

Talk to your hepatitis clinic or HTC about working with your local doctor. Hep C treatment can now be prescribed by any doctor or nurse practitioner experienced in hep C treatment, or in liaison with a hepatitis specialist

  • Is something else stopping you from getting hep C treatment?

Talk to your HTC or Foundation about solutions. Change your future today!

 

As a Partner in the national World Hepatitis Day Campaign, HFA works working with Hepatitis Australia and State and Territory Foundations on the annual national awareness campaign and is committed to making a difference on hepatitis C in Australia.

 

Watch this space – more information and resources specifically for people with bleeding disorders coming soon!

 

MORE INFORMATION

Visit the national World Hepatitis Day website

Read more about the new treatments on the Hepatitis Australia website 


Date last reviewed: 28 July 2017
Important Note: This information was developed by Haemophilia Foundation Australia for education and information purposes only and does not replace advice from a treating health professional. Always see your health care provider for assessment and advice about your individual health before taking action or relying on published information.
This information may be printed or photocopied for educational purposes.